Reviews: The Earlies, Part 12

I Am the Cheese by Robert Cormier

Awesome book. Wonderfully mind-bending. Definitely my favorite young-adult fiction thriller.

Brothers: Life, Death, Truth by Ted Van Lieshout

Very touching. Short and sweet.

Angels & Demons by Dan Brown

Best mystery/thriller I’ve ever read. Even better than Brown’s famous ‘Da Vinci Code.’

Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

The epitome of Romantic (capital R).

A Million Little Pieces by James Frey

Would have been terrifying if it weren’t so obviously self-centered and contrived.

The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath

Sad. Beautiful. Great. Horrible. Read it.

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer

Really great book about a boy learning of his ancestry and history. Definitely recommended.

That Eye, The Sky by Tim Winton

Interesting. Not much to the story, but the writing is certainly creative. I suppose I’m glad to have read it because it’s just.. ‘different.’

The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde by R.L. Stevenson

Typical Romanticism. Comparable to ‘Frankenstein.’

A Prayer for the Dying by Stewart O’Nan

Scary and sad.

Reviews: The Earlies, Part 18

A Child Called It by Dave Pelzer 4.0/5.0

Amazing book. Sad, disturbing, heart-breaking, and maddening.

Tears of Rage by John Walsh 4.0/5.0

Incredibly sad story (true story) about a child’s kidnap and murder. Tear-jerking and intense. Very good book.

Lord of the Flies by William Golding 4.5/5.0

So awesome. (I warned you that some of these reviews were simplistic! I must have been in my “minimalist” period.)

The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger 5.0/5.0

Best book ever. Well, maybe not, but it’s certainly a favorite of mine.

And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie 4.5/5.0

I read this book in seventh grade, and it is what first got me interested in reading for fun. Until that point, I had only picked up the stray Goosebumps or Choose Your Own Adventure book. I’ve read this book three times and will probably read it again.

Moby Dick by Herman Melville 4.0/5.0

Stunning. One of the most – no, the most elaborately detailed book I have ever read. Not the most exciting plot, not the easiest language, not too many exciting sub-layers to the story. But definitely, positively one of the best books ever written. It took me 7 months to get through (and I’m an insanely fast reader) but it was well worth it.

The Pearl by John Steinbeck 4.0/5.0

Beautiful story about the evils of wealth and greed.

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows by J.K. Rowling 5.0/5.0

Amazing finale to an incredible series. Well done, Ms. Rowling. Well done.

Reviews: The Earlies, Part 17

The Sword of Bedwyr (Crimson Shadow Series, Book 1) by R.A. Salvatore 4.5/5.0

One of the best fantasy novels I’ve ever read – turned me on to R.A. Salvatore.

The Death and Life of Charlie St. Cloud by Ben Sherwood 4.5/5.0

I love this book and I will probably read it again. I’ve recommended it to many friends.

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon 4.5/5.0

Beautiful story about an autistic boy who embarks on a journey of discover, only to learn much more than he could have ever imagined. Very highly recommended.

The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky 5.0/5.0

Best book ever. No, seriously. I can’t say enough about the realistic beauty of this book – the characterization is masterful, the plot simple yet moving, the language and prose, hauntingly beautiful. I will read this one many, many times – and have passed it on to all the “Wallflowers” and readers that I know.

A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess 4.0/5.0

Awesome book.. incredibly inventive and scary. Brilliant social commentary, though possibly not my favorite of Anthony Burgess’s work.

33 Snowfish by Adam Rapp 4.0/5.0

Interesting. Short book.. worth the read.

Where the Red Fern Grows by Wilson Rawls 5.0/5.0

Probably my favorite young adult book – after the Harry Potter series. Beautiful and magical story.

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