BBAW

Book Blogging Community: #BBAW Day 4

CommunityConnection

Today’s prompt

Day 4 How do you stay connected to the community? Examples: social media, regular commenting, participation in blog events, etc. Tell us your faves! We all know that the book blogging community is BIG, and it’s growing every day. It’s really easy to feel overwhelmed or totally lost. We want to know how you feel connected. Is it a specific tribe you run with? Events that keep you grounded? Twitter? Instagram? Comments? Again, the sky’s the limit when it comes to the ways to “plug in” to this big ole network of book lovers, and we are dying to know methods.

How do I stay connected

I would like to answer this in a couple of ways. First, how do I stay connected technologically (literally) speaking? Well, you can find me on Twitter, Facebook, Goodreads, and Tumblr.  As far as the community choices I make; well, yes, I suppose I do have a regular “group” that I chat with, keep in touch with, and participate in events with.

In the last year, and for the next year, my participation is minimal due to professional and academic obligations (I teach college English full-time and am writing my doctoral dissertation for the PhD in American Literature). The book blogging community is still important to me, though. I’ve been highly engaged this week, for example, because BBAW holds a special place in my heart.  I’ve been blogging for ten years, and a self-identified “book blogger” for seven, and it’s not something I’m eager to give up entirely.

Why do I stay connected

For some, book blogging is a fun hobby: it is a way to connect with other like-minded people who have similar interests.  Book blogging can be a means of expression, or it can be a reading journal, or it can be a professional platform which is intended to lead to bigger and better things. 

All of these elements of Book Blogging are valid and important, and they are absolutely part of the purpose for me, too; but purpose is not meaning.

So, what does Book Blogging mean to me?  Well, this is where I put my serious face on.  This is where I become sentimental. This is where I thank the casual readers for stopping by and let them know that I understand if they decide to click on to the next blog, now. 

Book Blogging has meant, for me, two things:

Rebirth.

Most people who I know now or whom I have met recently assume that reading has always been an important (or even the most important) part of my life. After all, I currently hold two degrees in English (B.A. – English; M.A. English, emphasis in American Lit.) and I’m working on my third (Ph.D.) right now! But, actually, it was not until my second year of college that I really became a reader. In fact, I started college as a Biology Pre-Med major, with every intention of going on to Medical School and becoming a physician (oh, if only I had a Time-Turner!). 

Sure, I read books when I was a kid.  I read Goosebumps when I was young (I used to wait eagerly for the Scholastic catalogs to come out so that I could get my hands on the next ones!). In junior high, I read The Giver, My Brother Sam is Dead, and And Then There Were None. In high school, I remember reading Of Mice and Men, Kaffir Boy and Macbeth. I enjoyed reading – I liked pretty much every book I tried (with the exception of The Great Gatsby, which I learned to love much later), but I never saw reading as a pursuit or hobby that could actually “be something.”   

After my first year of college, I had some medical complications which quickly and permanently resolved me against the pursuit of an M.D. I was in search of another major. I tried History. I tried Geology. I tried Spanish. I found myself, in the middle of my junior year, still without a permanent, satisfying major: What the heck am I supposed to be doing with my life!? And then I tried English.  College-level English. The in-depth, close-reading, study and analysis of literature. Hello, World!

Once I figured out that my place, my destiny, was to be with literature, always, it wasn’t long before I discovered the world of book blogging. I had already been keeping an online journal for my personal thoughts and creative writing. But I was reading so many books for classes (and promptly forgetting what they were all about just a semester later) that I realized I needed to store this information somewhere, for future reference.

My first blog became a second. My second became a third. The third blog, finally, was specifically a book blog – and that blog became Roof Beam Reader. Now, seven years later, I have a distinct “Book Blogger” presence and personality.  It is so different from what I ever expected of myself but, somehow, it is everything I always wanted it to be. 

Identity

For all my life, I have been gay and, for most of my life, I was very overweight.  Although I did not “come out” until college, I suffered from a young age the burden of hiding who I truly was. I also had the added difficulty of growing up “the fat kid,” who was teased, bullied, and picked-on from time-to-time (though my experiences were not nearly as horrendous as I have witnessed of others). In college, I managed to get in shape and to become friends with an extraordinary group of people; but, though I became more comfortable and satisfied with my physical experience – it was still what the world couldn’t see that was haunting me. 

There was (and, to some degree, there still is) a fear of not being accepted or of being simply “tolerated.” And, scariest of all, there is always a fear of being truly persecuted because of who I am. For the most part, I have been fortunate enough to have friends and family who are incredibly caring and accepting (although, they’re so beyond “accepting” that accepting doesn’t seem to fit). Still, there have been and always will be people who just can’t seem to look past this one part of me to see the whole of me, or to even be willing to try. I remember one day, in college, coming home from class to see the word “FAG” written in black permanent marker on my apartment door. I couldn’t imagine what I might have done to upset someone that much, and it was a very long time before I realized that I wasn’t the one responsible for how they felt and for what they did.

For me, although I have had a semi-charmed life, compared to what many have experienced, I have learned enough about life and about human nature to know that we all need a safe space. Roof Beam Reader, just a book blog, is, nonetheless my book blog. It has been my space to say, think, and feel what I want, without fear of rejection or disapproval. It is also my space to welcome others – all others – and to guarantee that, when they are here, they, too, have a safe space to share, to communicate, to learn, and to laugh.       

So, this is what Book Blogging means to me.  It means owning who I am and welcoming others to be a part of my journey. It means giving others, those who are like me or not, a safe space to talk about the one thing we all have in common: a love of books and reading! It means meeting people from all over the world, growing vicariously through their experiences and hoping to share with them some of my own.

Book Blogging, in effect, means more to me than I could ever express, and I sincerely thank each and every one of you who have made a place for me in this world. Happy BBAW!

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BBAW, Giveaway, Giveaway Hop, Giveaways, Monthly Review

Book Bloggers Made Me Do It #BBAW

Day-OneIntroduce-yourself-14

It’s the third day of Book Blogger Appreciation Week and we’ve got a new blog topic to discuss! Here’s what the fearless leaders came up with: Day 3 Have you ever read a book because of a book blogger? Be it a good book or bad, bloggers recommend books every day of the year. Sometimes we take their advice and it’s great! Hello every graphic novel I’ve ever read! Sometimes, it’s not so great. Damn you Like Water for Chocolate (ducks). Today, tell us all about the book or books you’ve read because of a book blogger and be sure to sure to spread the blame around.

Okay. I think I can handle this. There must be many, many books that I’ve read based solely on the recommendation (urging, pleading, threatening) of book blogger friends. But I’ll stick to just the first five that come to min.

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1. Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell

II am fairly certain that I would have read this book sooner or later, but a few years ago Jillian and I and a few others started The Classics Club. I learned then (and have been reminded many times throughout the years) that Jill adores Gone With the Wind. So, I put it on my club list and got to it a year or so later. I don’t regret it! I hadn’t seen the movie, either, but after reading the book I had to compare. Anyway, here are my thoughts on the book!

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2. The Saga series by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples

As a kid, I was a pretty big fan of comic books. I loved the X-Men, Adam Warlock, the Avengers, and more. I got really into the Death of Superman storyline, and all the new supermen to follow. As well as the darker Batman stories, like A Death in the Family. After my teenage years, though, and after discovering “real” books, I kind of let my love of comics fall by the wayside. I think the only comics I read between the age of, oh, fourteen and twenty, was probably Marvel’s Civil War series. About a year ago, I was in the mood to revisit. I sent out a tweet about how to get back into comics/graphic novels, and the overwhelming response was to try SAGA. I did. I’m in love. I’m obsessed! I even gave the first few volumes to my comic-book-reading brother-in-law for Christmas last year.

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3. Ariel by Sylvia Plath

Years ago, I read Plath’s The Bell Jar and really enjoyed it. Or, well, “enjoy” is probably the wrong word for a book like that. But I responded to it, appreciated it. I hadn’t visited Plath again because I have never been much of a poetry reader (this has changed in the last year or so). It was my friend Amy’s love of Plath, though, coupled with my preparing for doctoral field exams in American Literature, which lead me to read Ariel. And oh my goodness. I’ve written my thoughts on it, and I’ll leave it there. I’m not sure what else to say. Thanks, Amy!

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4. Germinal by Emile Zola

Zola is someone who I had heard of but never knew anyone who had actually read him (or at least not recently or extensively). But then I met O from Behold the Stars who just raves about Zola. I took a chance and read this masterpiece, and it is just that, a masterpiece! Zola reminds me quite a bit of one of my favorite American writers, John Steinbeck, so of course I enjoyed the book. I’m looking forward to reading more (I’ve got a couple of his others on my shelves… it’ll happen).

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5. Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel

This one, like Erin Morgenstern’s The Night Circus is one of those books where I just caved into the overwhelming book blogger pressure. Yes, peer pressure exists in the book blogging world! In both cases (and, honestly, I just went with Station Eleven because it was the most recent) the book actually lived up to the hype. I recall seeing this one plastered all over Twitter and a number of blogs, to rave reviews. I’m glad I trusted my book blogging pals and took the chance, it was a super cool read. I think the next one I’ll be “pressured” into reading is The Library at Mount Char, which I bought during the hype but haven’t read, yet.  Here’s my review for Station Eleven.

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BBAW

Return of #BBAW: 5-Book Introduction

Day-OneIntroduce-yourself-14

How exciting! Book Blogger Appreciation Week is back! And it’s being hosted by The Estella Society! Will wonders never cease?

Although I’ve taken a general hiatus from book blogging (except for monthly updates on reading, writing, etc.), this was an event not to be missed. As a long-time blogger (7 years? gosh), I felt this was an appropriate week for a bit of a comeback and reintroduction.

The first prompt asks us to “introduce [ourselves] by [sharing] five books that represent you as a person or your interests/lifestyle.”

If that’s not an impossible challenge, I don’t know what is. FIVE books? At least the folks at BBAW have admitted that this is a tough task. We’ll give them credit for that!  Anyhow, I think I’ll try to choose three books that represent me the person/reader, and another two that represent my interests/lifestyle. If I’m going to make a list, I might as well create sub-lists, too!

3 Books That Represent Me the Person/Me the Reader

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If This Isn’t Nice, What Is? by Kurt Vonnegut. Vonnegut, in general, is my writer soul-mate. I adore his voice and his wit. I respond overwhelmingly to his dark humor and his cautionary humanism. I chose this particularly title as representative for his corpus (and my love and appreciation for it) because it is filled with wisdom and wonder. Vonnegut, despite his cynicism, offers young people and other readers some positivity, and asks them to be a little bit more, do a bit more, be better, every day.

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The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky. I can’t think of a book that has affected me more than this one. I don’t know how many times I’ve read it, and when the film adaptation finally came out, my best friends and I (despite being far outside the target audience demographic at that point) rushed to see it during opening weekend. The main character, Charlie, just always felt like me-in-print. And the friendships in that book reminded me so much of my own.

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The Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling. Yes, of course this seems cliché at this point. When I was younger(-ish), I was not much of a reader. There were some few books I had really enjoyed (Agatha Christie, Lois Lowry, Goosebumps), but I was not “a reader.” Then my librarian neighbor recommended this new series to me, and my whole life changed. That sounds like hyperbole, but it is not. My entire life’s trajectory changed. This non-reader is now a College English Instructor completing his PhD in American Literature. If I hadn’t fallen in love with Potter, I wouldn’t have fallen in love with reading.

2 Books That Represent My Interests

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Eminent Outlaws: Gay Writers Who Changed America by Christopher Bram. This is an excellent survey of gay American writers in the late-twentieth century. Bram, who also wrote the wonderful  book, Gods and Monsters, does a great job explaining how important these gay writers were, how they influenced society, culture and politics, and how they communicated with one another. I was well into my own doctoral work (studying earlier American gay writing) when I read this book, but it became a source of inspiration to me.

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Orlando by Virginia Woolf. This book ticks a lot of boxes for the “getting to know me/my interests” category. First, it’s a classic. Although I’m an eclectic reader who enjoys a whole host of genres, my reading and blogging reflects a definite favoritism toward classic literature. I’m also the Classic Literature Expert for About.com, so there’s that. The book is written by a woman, and a brilliant one at that; and I make a concerted effort to read women and minority writers. I’m also simply a huge fan of Virginia Woolf, although that wasn’t always the case. Finally, the story itself explores gender and sexuality in interesting and complicated ways. These are two topics I’m fascinated by, so much so that they’ve become my life’s work.

So, that’s as much about me as I can share in 5 books. Did I manage? And, oh, hey! While you’re here: check out my Book Lover’s Giveaway for #BBAW! (You’ve gotta be participating in BBAW & following my blog in order to win – but why wouldn’t you be doing those things anyway?)

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BBAW, Blog Post, Book Blogger Appreciation Week

Wrapping Up & Winding Down (#BBAW Day 5)

Wow! Has it been a week, already?  Alright, one week is not a whole lot of time, in the grand scheme of things.  But this week in particular seems to have flown by!  I think I spent more time visiting blogs, commenting, and writing up posts than I have in a very long time (maybe since BBAW last  year?!). 

Granted, I did a lot for last month’s Austen in August event and will probably do a lot for next month’s The Literary Others event, but the larger feel of BBAW – the “all of the book blogging world can be included” aspect of it just felt so good. 

What did I get out of this week?  Well, I got the opportunity to express how I felt about book blogging.  I was able to meet some new-to-me book bloggers (and even subscribe to a few!) and to share one book that I really loved, but which seems to fly under the radar.  I also gave a shout-out to a few favorite bloggers who really deserve the recognition.

From this experience, I take with me a renewed respect and appreciation for the book blogging community and for the time and effort, generally unrewarded (in the literal sense) that we each of us put into this “hobby” of ours.  No one knows better than the book blogger what it is to pursue an interest with passion and vigor – it was amazing to see that passion in action this week, in such a concrete, measurable way.  Might I suggest: We are an extraordinary group of people

So, for now, I say ‘thank you’ for visiting with me this week & for introducing me to new blogs, new bloggers, new books, and new authors.  I say ‘goodbye’ and ‘until next year’ when, hopefully, we will all meet again.  And I leave you with a few of my favorite posts of the week:

The Classics Club is Spotlighted for BBAW

O Délaissé Recommends a Flaubert Book that Looks GREAT

Fiktshun’s Thoughtful Post on the Meaning of Book Blogging

Jillian from A Room of One’s Own Interviews Herself (Hilarious)

There were so many great, interesting, hilarious, and thought-provoking posts generated throughout the event.  It is impossible, really, to pick “favorites” (even though I sort of did, didn’t I?) – so my suggestion would be to spend some time going back through each day’s posts and read what these book bloggers have to say.  There are some real gems out there, thoughts from all different types of bloggers who are interested in all different types of books, and who live all over the world. 

Until next year!

“We read to know that we are not alone.”  – William Nicholson

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BBAW, Blog Post, Book Blogger Appreciation Week

This Book, I Love. (#BBAW Day 4)

Today is Day #4 of Book Blogger Appreciation Week.  Our task (or goal) this time is to recommend, promote, shout about, or “pimp out” a book we have discovered that we feel needs and deserves more love & attention. 

As our host states:  One of the best parts about book blogging is the exposure to books and authors you might never have heard of before. Pimp the book you think needs more recognition on this day. Get creative! Maybe share snippets from other bloggers who have reviewed it or make some fun art to get your message across.

Originally, I was going to blather on about multiple books – one from each major genre that I have read over the past few years; but, I realized that was going to be a lot of work and people would probably stop reading.  So, nearly impossible as this is, I have narrowed down that original list to just one book which I read rather randomly, fell in love with, and really feel deserves more attention.  It is a book I have spoken of on a few occasions, but with good reason!

The Book: Under the Poppy

The Author: Kathe Koja

My Full Review: Click Here

Where/Why Bought: At Borders – Because I fell in love with the cover!

A Brief Synopsis:

If you can imagine a marriage between the coy, tongue-in-cheek, clever mysteries of Agatha Christie and the melancholic, whimsical, romantic lyricism of Shakespeare, then perhaps you have an understanding of what Kathe Koja has created with Under the Poppy.  The place is 1870s Brussels, amidst what one assumes is the beginnings of the Franco-Prussian War.  The book’s main players – Rupert Bok and Istvan – are life-long lovers, drawn together in boyhood, pulled apart by circumstances.  The two, in their youth, somehow became entangled with the darkest, most powerful and secretive of high-society.  That entanglement, coupled with the two’s dangerous romance, results in a perpetual cat-and-mouse game between the story’s antagonists (de Metz and his servants – the General, in particular) and the puppeteer-players. 

If ever the phrase “all the world’s a stage / and all the men and women merely players” were to fit a novel – this would be that novel.  Koja leaves the reader stunned by the brutal honesty of the story – no punches are pulled, and yet the tale is told so beautifully, so passionately, and so artistically, it becomes hard, at times, to pull one’s self off of this stage and remember that we are only the audience to this bittersweet drama. 


I have given away a few copies of this book to folks who I think (hope) will enjoy it.  It’s also on the list of recommendations/suggestions for my upcoming reading event (October’s “The Literary Others: An LGBT Reading Event“).

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BBAW, Blog Post, Book Blogger Appreciation Week, Events, Personal

What Book Blogging Means to Me (#BBAW Day 3)

So, here we are on Day 3 of Book Blogging Appreciation Week.  It’s about the half-way point of this incredibly fun and interactive event and today’s topic/question is a good (but sorta tough!) one:

“What does Book Blogging mean to you?”

Goodness gracious, where does one begin with a question like that?  I sit here wondering:  Should I take the question literally and point out the various elements of Book Blogging that are specifically relevant to me and my blog, such as writing reviews, hosting events, or babbling about literary topics

Or, perhaps I should talk about the events like Top Ten Tuesdays, Literary Giveaway Blog Hop, and Banned Books Week that are hosted by other bloggers, but which are enjoyable for me (and so, therefore, I try to participate in them as often as possible).

But, the more I think about it, the more I want to really answer the question of meaning.  For some, book blogging is a fun hobby: it is a way to connect with other like-minded people who have similar interests.  Book blogging can be a means of expression, or it can be a reading journal, or it can be a professional platform which is intended to lead to bigger and better things. 

All of these elements of Book Blogging are valid and important, and they are absolutely part of the purpose for me, too; but purpose is not meaning.

So, what does Book Blogging mean to me?  Well, this is where I put my serious face on.  This is where I become sentimental and revelatory.  This is where I thank the casual readers for stopping by and let them know that I understand if they decide to click on to the next blog, now. 

Book Blogging has meant, for me, two things:

Rebirth.

Most people who I know now or whom I have met recently assume that reading has always been an important (or even the most important) part of my life.  After all, I currently hold two degrees in English (B.A. – English; M.A. English, emphasis in American Lit.) and I’m working on my third (Ph.D.) right now!  But, actually, it was not until my second year of college that I really became a reader.  In fact, I started college as a Biology Pre-Med major, with every intention of going on to Medical School and becoming a physician (oh, if only I had a Time-Turner!). 

Sure, I read books when I was a kid.  I read Goosebumps when I was young (I used to wait eagerly for the Scholastic catalogs to come out so that I could get my hands on the next ones!).  In junior high, I read The Giver, My Brother Sam is Dead, and And Then There Were None.  In high school, I remember reading Of Mice and Men, Kaffir Boy and Macbeth.   I enjoyed reading – I liked pretty much every book I tried (with the exception of The Great Gatsby, which I learned to love much later), but I never saw reading as a pursuit or hobby that could actually “be something.”   

After my first year of college, I had some medical complications which quickly and permanently resolved me against the pursuit of an M.D.  I was in search of another major.  I tried History.  I tried Geology.  I tried Spanish.   I found myself, in the middle of my junior year, still without a permanent, satisfying major: What the heck am I supposed to be doing with my life!?  And then I tried English.  College-level English.  The in-depth, close-reading, study and analysis of literature.  Hello, World!

Once I figured out that my place, my destiny, was to be with literature, always, it wasn’t long before I discovered the world of book blogging.  I had already been keeping an online journal for my personal thoughts and creative writing.  But I was reading so many books for classes (and promptly forgetting what they were all about just a semester later) that I realized I needed to store this information somewhere, for future reference.

My first blog became a second.  My second became a third.  The third blog, finally, was specifically a book blog – and that blog became Roof Beam Reader.  Now, more than three years later, I have a distinct “Book Blogger” presence and personality.  It is so different from what I ever expected of myself but, somehow, it is everything I always wanted it to be. 

Safety

For all my life, I have been gay and, for most of my life, I was very overweight.  Although I did not “come out” until college, I suffered from a young age the burden of hiding who I truly was.  I also had the added difficulty of growing up “the fat kid,” who was teased, bullied, and picked-on from time-to-time (though my experiences were not nearly as horrendous as I have witnessed of others).  In college, I managed to get in shape and to become friends with an extraordinary group of people; but, though I became more comfortable and satisfied with my physical experience – it was still what the world couldn’t see that was haunting me. 

There was (and, to some degree, there still is) a fear of not being accepted or of being simply “tolerated.”  And, scariest of all, there is always a fear of being truly persecuted because of who I am.  For the most part, I have been fortunate enough to have friends and family who are incredibly caring and accepting (although, they’re so beyond “accepting” that accepting doesn’t seem to fit).  Still, there have been and always will be people who just can’t seem to look past this one part of me to see the whole of me, or to even be willing to try.  I remember one day, in college, coming home from class to see the word “FAG” written in black permanent marker on my apartment door.  I couldn’t imagine what I might have done to upset someone that much, and it was a very long time before I realized that I wasn’t the one responsible for how they felt and for what they did.

For me, although I have had a semi-charmed life, compared to what many have experienced, I have learned enough about life and about human nature to know that we all need a safe space.  Roof Beam Reader, just a book blog, is, nonetheless my book blog.  It is my space to say, think, and feel what I want, without fear of rejection or disapproval.  It is also my space to welcome others – all others – and to guarantee that, when they are here, they, too, have a safe space to share, to communicate, to learn, and to laugh.       

So, this is what Book Blogging means to me.  It means owning who I am and welcoming others to be a part of my journey.  It means giving others, those who are like me or not, a safe space to talk about the one thing we all have in common: a love of books and reading!  It means meeting people from all over the world, growing vicariously through their experiences and hoping to share with them some of my own.

Book Blogging, in effect, means more to me than I could ever express, and I sincerely thank each and every one of you who have made a place for me in this world.

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BBAW, Book Blogger Appreciation Week, Events, guest post, interview

#BBAW Day 2: Interview Swap! (Obsession with Books)

I am honored to have Sharon of Obsession with Books visiting for BBAW Day 2’s “Interview Swap!”  

Please give her a warm welcome!


1)      Tell us a little about your blog – when you started, what your focus is, why you do it, etc.

I started Obsession with Books in March 2011; I had been reading and reviewing on Goodreads but ‘stalking’ book blogs regularly so I thought why not? I can do this; it was an easier way for me to log my thoughts on books and series as well as meet like-minded book lovers and promote authors.

My main focus is promoting books and authors I love in the Young Adult genre, I was all over the place initially, having no clear direction and my book range was quite eclectic so I am now more focused about what I read and blog about – I want to continue to blog for fun and as a hobby.

Blogging is an outlet for me to express my thoughts, get in contact with people who are as passionate about reading as what I am and it’s also an introduction to new books and authors.

2)      Can you give us three books that you consider “Must Reads?”

Can I cheat on this one and give your three series? 😉 My all time favorite author is Karen Marie Moning, her Fever series is one I have read over and over again and I’m sure I’ll continue to. The world she has created is phenomenal and thoroughly entertaining.

Julie Kagawa’s Iron Fey series is another favorite; I love her fantasy world and the characters; each of her books is wonderful and left me thinking about them long after I had finished.

I am hooked on Jennifer L. Armentrout’s Covenant series at the moment, the characters and her take on mythology is compelling and enjoyable and I love the humor she includes in each of her books.

3)      What do you most appreciate about book blogging?

The community as a whole; I have no ‘real life friends or family’ who share my love of reading so I appreciate the ability to be able to chat with other bloggers about books, series, authors etc. and know they understand what I am carrying on about. Also, being able to share my thoughts and opinions about a book with others and believing I am in some way, shape or form helping to influence what they chose to read. It’s also great to be able to promote an author I really like.

4)      When you are not reading or blogging, what else do you like to do with your time?

I have two children so a lot of my time is spent doing mummy things like homework or playing with them – one is in year one and the other in pre-school so my spare days while they are at school gives me a lot of time to do things I love like cooking (I’m a sweet freak), socializing with friends or watching movies (I’m a huge action movie fan) and I am about to start studying by correspondence to be a Teaching Aide.

5)      If you had the opportunity to go back in time and write any book (one that you now consider a favorite), which book would it be and why does it appeal to you?

Most probably book three in the Hunger Games trilogy, Mockingjay – I am a huge fan of this series and although I loved this book I would actually want to re-write it; there were too many loose ends and it felt very rushed, the ending made me sad whereas I wanted happy after everything these characters had endured. It was a bittersweet ending to an otherwise brilliant thought-provoking series.

6)      How would you describe your perfect reading day?

Housework done, no plans whatsoever – down at our local park under a tree with enough snacks and no interruptions to laze back and enjoy my book, far away from real life.

7)      Share an interesting/weird/random/funny fact about yourself with us!

Hmm, this one is hard! I am extremely introverted and shy and have a huge fear of being surrounded by strangers or put on the spot.

None of my family (besides my husband) or friends has any idea I have a blog or that I read as much as I do and filling out interview questions freaks me out 😉

Thank-you so much Adam! It was wonderful ‘meeting’ and getting to know you.


Thanks, Sharon, for stopping by and sharing a bit about yourself and your blog!  And, thank you for your response re: Mockingjay! I completely agree with you about the loose-ends!

Folks, feel free to head on over to Obsession with Books to read my interview responses!

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