Sunday Salon

Sunday Salon (1:10)

RBR Sunday Salon

Volume 1, Issue 10

Welcome to the 10th volume of Sunday Salon! Today finds us in the middle of autumn, with the clocks having fallen back an hour here in the United States (which means I’m awake an hour earlier than necessary!) I’m not entirely sure why we still honor “daylight savings time,” but I never complain about it in the fall. Ask me again in the spring, when we lose an hour, and I may tell another tale.

Below, please find links to interesting content around the web that I’ve read in the last two weeks. Some of these are very newly published, while others are content that may have been published a while ago but which I only stumbled across this week. Please share what you’ve been reading in the comments below!

Blog Posts I Loved

  • Exploring Literature: Reading Darkness to Find the Light. In times of crisis, what should we read? Should we read books that expose the dark side of humanity, or should we seek instead more uplifting books? Readers (and film-goers) today seem to fall into one or the other category.
  • Shelf Love: One Person, No Vote. Each chapter details a different way that voting is made difficult or reduced the power of certain people’s votes. Besides strict registration laws and gerrymandering, there are voter ID laws and the purging of voter rolls, as well as uneven enforcement of the laws in place.
  • Pages Unbound: Why I’ll Always Support Required Reading in Schools. English, or literary studies, is its own field and has its own content. Students who have achieved basic literacy are not being asked to read books in class just so they can expand their vocabulary or learn grammar. When instructors choose books for their classes to read, they have (or should have, if they are knowledgeable about their field) real goals in mind, goals related to the specific field of literary studies.

Literary Miscellany

  • Chicago Review of Books: A Different Kind of Halloween Reading List. Most readers will agree that October is the best time to read that horror novel that’s been sitting on your shelf for ages. But it’s also a great time to explore some recent nonfiction.
  • Chicago Review of Books: Therese Anne Fowler Reminds Us How Insane the Gilded Age Really Was. Given the runaway success of Therese Anne Fowler’s novel Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald, it’s not surprising that her new novel, A Well-Behaved Woman, has been among the fall’s most highly anticipated historical fiction releases. This time Fowler takes on the lesser-known figure of Alva Vanderbilt, who married into one of America’s richest Gilded Age families and took bold actions to steer herself, her family and society forward into a better future.

History & Politics

Culture & Society

Science, Tech., & Nature

Teaching & Writing

  • The Chronicle: Do You Make them Call You Professor? O ver dinner following a scholarly lecture, my colleagues and I began debating a familiar question: Do you make your students call you “Professor”? Opinions and practices seemed roughly correlated to the age, gender, and cultural background of the professor.
  • The Chronicle: When You Communicate with Students, Tone Matters. If you want students to be motivated to learn in your classroom, they need to value the goals you set for them, believe that accomplishing those goals is possible, and feel supported along the way.

Recent Posts from Roof Beam Reader

Currently Reading

  • Call Me By Your Name by Andre Aciman (re-read)
  • The House of the Vampire by George Sylvester Viereck

Thank you for stopping by and taking part in another SUNDAY SALON. There was much to choose from this week, and I hope I have presented you with a decent selection. I would love to hear your thoughts on any of these or the other things you’ve read this week! (Tell me what I missed!) 


All work found on roofbeamreader.com is copyright of the original author and cannot be borrowed, quoted, or reused in any fashion without the express, written permission of the author.


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Sunday Salon

Sunday Salon (1:9)

RBR Sunday Salon

Volume 1, Issue 9

Another happy autumn Sunday to you all! You may have noticed the lack of a Sunday Salon last week, for which I apologize. It was a crazy week and I didn’t get much time to read for pleasure, so I thought it best to hold back for a week rather than share links to things I hadn’t had a chance to peruse myself, yet.

That said, I’m back with a bang this week! There were so many interesting stories in a variety of topic areas this week (or that I discovered this week, anyway.) I hope you’ll enjoy some of the items below. Let me know what you think! And did I miss anything substantial? Leave it in the comments. 🙂

Blog Posts I Loved

  • Hogglestock: Which Class Would You Take? “There is no place more quietly exciting than a campus bookstore in the fall. After I had exhausted all the regular bookstores in Berkeley I found myself in a few that sold course books. I thought fondly of how much I loved going course book shopping when I was in school.”
  • Brevity: Explaining Pain: How I Wrote “A Murder of Crows.” “The story of the murder came from our eldest son who had attended and then worked as a counselor in a local children’s camp. One of his last summers, perhaps even the last, he came home from the first week with a terrible story.”
  • On Bookes: The Penguin Book of the Undead. “The book, as the subtitle promises us, takes us through 1,500 years of the supernatural beginning with an extract from Homer’s Odyssey: Odysseus in the House of Death, the to Pliny the Younger’s musings on the existence of ghosts from his Letters, and finally for that section an extract from Lucan’s Pharsalia.”
  • In Libris Veritas: Graphic Novel Review: Saga Vol. 7. “I have long maintained that Saga’s strength lay in the story of family and what they are willing to do in order to stay together and protect them. In some ways, this is still true, but I find that 7 volumes in that’s not really enough anymore.”

Literary Miscellany

  • The Paris Review: The Silence of Sexual Assault in Literature. “The hashtag #WhyIDidntReport generated thousands of testimonies about the societal forces that push victims into silence in the aftermath of assault. That silence, unheard by anyone else but shatteringly loud inside one’s head, is an open secret in American life. It is also an open secret in American literature.”
  • Book Riot: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar Dives Back into Mystery with Mycroft and Sherlock. “You may know Kareem Abdul-Jabbar as a legendary basketball player. What you may not know is that he’s a huge Holmesian (literally and figuratively) and a fantastic writer. Since leaving the game, Abdul-Jabbar has served as a U.S. cultural ambassador and he’s written extensively and widely.”

History & Politics

  • The New Yorker: Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s Unlikely Path to the Supreme Court. “Unlike candidates for political office, most sitting Justices have preferred to remain, if not anonymous, largely unknown. The position is unelected, the appointment is for life, and the Justices are not supposed to place themselves in the public eye, for fear of making themselves beholden to public opinion: arguably, the less attention to their personal lives the better.”
  • The Nib: Drag Balls of the Civil War. “Queerness has always existed—even on the Civil War battlefield.”

Culture & Society

  • Ones to Watch: From a Young Wolverine to Cultural Pop Icon: The ‘Bloom’ of Troye Sivan. “If I have ever used the term “bop” unironically and unapologetically, it has been when describing Troye Sivan’s music. The 23-year-old triple threat from Johannesburg, South Africa, albeit groomed by Perth, Australia, is more than a glowing pop superstar; he is changing the very fabric of what pop looks like.”
  • JSTOR Daily: From Samhain to Halloween. “Even if our daily lives have little connection to agricultural seasons, we often celebrate Halloween by decorating our homes with gourds and corn. We carve pumpkins into the image of Jack-o’-Lantern, even if we don’t know his story.”

Science, Tech., & Nature

Teaching & Writing

  • The Chronicle: A Letter to Post-Graduate Student Me. “What your professors expect — more than anything — is for you to want to learn because you’re passionate about a topic, not because you’re passionate about doing well.”
  • EdSurge: Can You Teach Good Writing? “McPhee lays out his course in his latest book, Draft No. 4: On the Writing Process, and I was eager to talk to him about his craftsmanship as a teacher. To my surprise, though, he downplayed his impact in the classroom, and even suggested that you can’t really teach the kind of writing that he, in fact, teaches.”

Recent Posts from Roof Beam Reader

  • Nothing new.

Currently Reading

  • The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood
  • Good Without God by Greg Epstein

Thank you for stopping by and taking part in another SUNDAY SALON. There was much to choose from this week, and I hope I have presented you with a decent selection. I would love to hear your thoughts on any of these or the other things you’ve read this week! (Tell me what I missed!) 


All work found on roofbeamreader.com is copyright of the original author and cannot be borrowed, quoted, or reused in any fashion without the express, written permission of the author.


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Sunday Salon

Sunday Salon (1:8)

RBR Sunday Salon

Volume 1, Issue 8

Happy Sunday, readers! I hope the early autumn season is treating you well, so far, and that you are finding plenty of time for reading and relaxation. As is typical for me, this Sunday leaves me with far too much to do, and far too little time for relaxation; but that’s what being a procrastinator gets you!

Once again, there was a lot in the news this week on a variety of topics, and even more great reading to be found in the literary and blog spheres. I couldn’t possibly share everything I read, liked, or bookmarked, but here are some I wanted to note. I hope you find something interesting in the links below!

Blog Posts I Loved

  • My Untitled Project: Fall. I feel as though all summer I got burnt up, like leaves on a tree, and now I am ready to shed all of these old, dead appendages. I am ready to stand with nothing, to turn inward and hibernate during the cold months, then bloom beautifully in the spring.
  • Note to My White Self: In Support of White History Month. Recently, a woman of color asked me, “What do you know about whiteness?” I stumbled through a response, offering some abstract thoughts about white supremacy and privilege.  She was not impressed.
  • Jess Witkins Happiness Project: What It’s Like to Be a Woman in America. Like so many women right now, this past week has made me feel a full cup’s worth of anxiety and two tablespoons of crushing grief. Then mix that with a blender powered by my rage with the patriarchy, and you have a slight understanding of where I’m at right now.

Literary Miscellany

  • Book Riot: Women, Trauma, and Haunted Houses. But what do women do in the haunted house? How does the haunted house function as the terrain on which women work out their fears and anxieties? In this post, I examine three haunted house books written by women to find out.
  • Lit Hub: 30 of the Worst Couples in Literature. All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way, Tolstoy wrote. Same goes for couples. That is, the bad ones may be very bad, but they sure make for some great stories—particularly when everyone involved is fictional, so you can indulge your romantic schadenfreude guilt-free.

History & Politics

  • Politico: Why Jane Fonda Doesn’t Hate Donald Trump. You want to tell people things they don’t know,” Fonda said on the podcast. “Just like what changed and saved my life was being told things I didn’t know by American soldiers. We have to reach out and listen and then respond in a way that’s meaningful.”
  • Lit Hub: William Faulkner was Really Bad at Being a Postman. The inspector goes on to accuse Faulkner of various faults, including failing to deliver letters, mistreating mail of all types, permitting “unauthorized persons” into the office, and writes that he has heard reports of how Faulkner is “indifferent to interest of patrons, unsocial, rarely ever speak[ing] to patrons of the office unless absolutely necessary.

Culture & Society

Science, Tech., & Nature

  • The New York Times: Caffeine May Increase Pain Tolerance. The experiment controlled for sex and race, current tobacco use and alcohol consumption, among other variables that could affect pain sensation. Still, they found that the more caffeine consumed, the greater the tolerance for pain.
  • CNET: Facebook Breach Put Data of 50-Million Users At Risk. Facebook also said later Friday that the breach also affected third-party apps that you have linked to your Facebook account, including Instagram. As a precautionary measure, Facebook logged about 90 million people out of their accounts, the company said.

Teaching & Writing

  • The Chronicle: On Not Reading. The activity of nonreading is something that scholars rarely discuss. When they — or others whose identities are bound up with books — do so, the discussions tend to have a shamefaced quality. Blame “cultural capital” — the sense of superiority associated with laying claim to books that mark one’s high social status.
  • Good News, Bad News. I get so bogged down in the day-to-day that, much of the time, I forget to do what it is I need to do, which is to write. Hearing from publishers who think your work has value and meaning does much to reinvigorate the spirit!

Recent Posts from Roof Beam Reader

Currently Reading

  • The Haunting of Hill House by Shirley Jackson

Thank you for stopping by and taking part in another SUNDAY SALON. There was much to choose from this week, and I hope I have presented you with a decent selection. I would love to hear your thoughts on any of these or the other things you’ve read this week! (Tell me what I missed!) 


All work found on roofbeamreader.com is copyright of the original author and cannot be borrowed, quoted, or reused in any fashion without the express, written permission of the author.


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Sunday Salon

Sunday Salon (1:7)

RBR Sunday Salon

Volume 1, Issue 7

A fine Sunday to you, dear readers! The autumn season has now officially arrived and we’re sure feeling the cool down here in Las Vegas! By that I mean, we’ve actually had a few consecutive days where temperatures did not reach 100-degrees. Progress! (It’s still in the mid-and upper-90s.) That said, a cool down is a cool down, and it is psychologically even more affecting, I think. With the temperature break, Jesse and I decided to spend the weekend outdoors, most significantly in another hike around Red Rock Canyon. The pictures I’ve included in this week’s Salon are from Saturday’s journey through the canyon. Hope you enjoy!

That said, I still managed to find time throughout the week to do quite a bit of pleasure reading, including the usual topics (science, environment, education, writing, politics, etc.) It was a pretty interesting reading week, in fact, and I hope you’ll find something here that you enjoy. Let me know your thoughts!

Blog Posts I Loved

  • Flying Paperbacks: Tropes That Can Burn Their Tongues on Hot Oatmeal. “As of late, I’ve been reading a lot of tropey books, but that’s not what made me think of this post. And I started thinking: tropes are a thing… am I okay with them? I mean, the answer is no, some tropes irk my soul and I’m going to dish them out.”
  • Beth Fish Reads: Thoughts on 10 Years of Blogging. “The very best part about blogging: I’ve made some amazing friends in the last 10 years, and I’ve been fortunate enough to meet many of them in real life. Some no longer blog, but I still keep up with their lives through mutual friends or social media. I had no idea that the community of book bloggers would be filled with so many wonderful people.
  • Adventures of a Bibliophile: Reading Recommendations-Banned Books (Diverse Books Edition). ” I want to share some of my favorite diverse banned books. There are so many great diverse books out there, and some of my favorites have at one point been banned or challenged (let’s face it, a lot of amazing books have).”

Literary Miscellany

  • Literary Hub: How the Great Lorraine Hansberry tried to Make Sense of it All. “In 34 years, the briefest life of the great Hansberrys, she left a lasting impression. She was an artist and an activist. She was strident and striking, an aesthete, and, as John Oliver Killens called her, ‘a socialist with a black nationalist perspective.'”
  • Vulture: A Premature Attempt at the 21st Century Canon. “You never know exactly what you’ll discover when sending out a survey like this, the results of which owe something to chance and a lot to personal predilections. But given the sheer volume of stuff published each year, it is remarkable that a survey like this would yield any kind of consensus—which this one did.”
  • Cosmopolitan: The 15 YA Books Every Adult Should Read. “Let’s be clear: there is ~no shame~ in loving young adult literature, even if you yourself are, say, an “old” or “regular” adult. In fact, studies show that more than half of YA readers are actually adult-adults, which sort of calls the whole meaning of the phrase into question and makes you wonder if this system of categorizing books by target audience is dumb to begin with.”

History & Politics

Culture & Society

  • CN Traveler: Starbucks Has Officially Landed in Italy. “The 25,000 square-foot Reserve Roastery is being hailed as their “most beautiful store to-date,” according to a press release, with a mosaic floor handcrafted in the Northern Italian Palladiana style and marble countertops sourced from Tuscany (and unlike in most espresso bars, these ones are heated). There’s also a wood-oven bakery dubbed The Princi Bakery, a 22-foot bronze cask roasting coffee beans, an affogato station, and an open-air terrace.”

Science, Tech., & Nature

  • JSTOR Daily: Do Artificial Reefs Work? “In many areas, authorities are disposing of old objects at sea to provide fish habitats. To create an artificial reef (AR), a large structure such as a ship is cleaned of toxic materials and dumped at sea. These can be anything from sculpted balls of cement to old subway cars.”

Teaching & Writing

  • The Chronicle: How Notre Dame Rethought Its Core Curriculum. “This fall Notre Dame introduced the most noteworthy changes to its core curriculum in more than 40 years, following a lengthy review process. Among other changes, the new core will provide a more cohesive and thoughtful introduction to the liberal arts.”
  • The Chronicle: The Insidious Imps of Writing. “Academics must write. Otherwise they don’t pass their grad courses, finish their dissertations, or get jobs, promotions, and raises. But barring us from success are the Imps of Inertia and the Wall of Habitual Self.”

Posts from Roof Beam Reader

Currently Reading

  • Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
  • People Kill People by Ellen Hopkins

Thank you for stopping by and taking part in another SUNDAY SALON. There was much to choose from this week, and I hope I have presented you with a decent selection. I would love to hear your thoughts on any of these or the other things you’ve read this week!


All work found on roofbeamreader.com is copyright of the original author and cannot be borrowed, quoted, or reused in any fashion without the express, written permission of the author.


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Sunday Salon

Sunday Salon (1:6)

RBR Sunday Salon

Volume 1, Issue 6

This week’s Sunday Salon is jam-packed with interesting reads from a variety of topics, including science, literature, writing, and my very own contributions here at Roof Beam Reader. It was a very busy week for me personally and professionally, but somehow I managed to read a lot of fascinating articles that I’d like to share with you all. For my own contributions, please scroll through to the bottom.

I look forward to hearing about what you’ve read/written this week, or what you think about the links I’ve shared. Please feel free to comment below. Happy September!

Blog Posts I Loved

  • Fanda Classiclit:  6 Degree of Separation: From The Origin to…. “I have just finished a wonderful book, of which I still need time to digest: Irving Stone’s The Origin—a historical account on Charles Darwin. As always with great books, it’d take me much time and efforts to review. On the other hand, my head is full of it and I was eager to write something. I have just finished a wonderful book, of which I still need time to digest: Irving Stone’s The Origin—a historical account on Charles Darwin. As always with great books, it’d take me much time and efforts to review. On the other hand, my head is full of it and I was eager to write something.”
  • Bookish Byron: Elizabeth Gaskell’s Mary Barton. “Considering this was Gaskell’s debut novel, I think it’s very telling of her ability as a writer. She often, more times than not, goes against the grain. She lived in Manchester, at the heart of the industrial revolution, and saw the negative impacts it had on the lives of the working class.”
  • Nut Free Nerd: A Classic Couple: The Catcher in the Rye and The Perks of Being a Wallflower. “This classic/contemporary duo always reminds me of the start of the school year, which makes this the perfect time to write about them here. I’m sure this pairing has been done many times before, but I still think there are some interesting parallels worth discussing.”

Literary Miscellany

  • Tor: Problematic Classics: Four Questions to Ask When Beloved Books Haven’t Aged Well. “Most of us who love speculative fiction run into this problem at some point. There are classics of the genre that are uncomfortable for various reasons. Some of them are straight-out racist, or unrepentantly misogynistic, or homophobic, or all of the above. How and why and when we come to these realizations can change depending on who we are.”
  • Literary Hub: What Does Immersing Yourself in a Book Really Do? “The act of taking on the perspective and feelings of others is one of the most profound, insufficiently heralded contributions of the deep-reading processes. Proust’s description of “that fertile miracle of communication effected in solitude” depicts an intimate emotional dimension within the reading experience: the capacity to communicate and to feel with another without moving an inch out of our private worlds.”
  • Scary Mommy: 20 LGBTQ Books for Kids from Preschooler to High School. “[Neither you nor your kid needs to be queer to enjoy these books. In fact, it if you are not queer, you should read them. Understand and see us. Then teach kindness and acceptance. LGBTQ books should be part of all kids’ reading materials and educational narrative.”

History & Politics

Culture & Society

  • Literary Hub: Grammar Purity is One Big Ponzi Scheme. “There’s no separating this debate from issues of class, race, geography, and socioeconomic status. The minute someone says x is standard and y is not, they’re making a judgment call about whose English reigns supreme. Just as the winners write the history books, the most powerful group of English language users write the grammar books.”
  • Oxford English Dictionary: A Brief History of Singular “They.” “Since forms may exist in speech long before they’re written down, it’s likely that singular they was common even before the late fourteenth century. That makes an old form even older.”
  • The Atlantic: Why Some Parents Turn Boys’ Names Into Girls’ Names. “She says that some parents “celebrate the idea of naming a baby girl James,” for instance, as an attempt to upset gender expectations by showing that girls can take on traits that are traditionally perceived as masculine. What’s noticeably absent, though, is a boomlet operating in the other direction.”

Science, Tech., & Nature

  • Scientific American: What Lucid Dreams Look Like. “Last month, for the first time in over a year, I had lucid dreams for two nights in a row. A lucid dream, or realizing that you’re dreaming while still inside of the dream, is not an unusual experience: most people will have at least one lucid dream in their lives.”
  • The Atlantic: Why We Forget Most of the Books We Read. “Surely some people can read a book or watch a movie once and retain the plot perfectly. But for many, the experience of consuming culture is like filling up a bathtub, soaking in it, and then watching the water run down the drain.”

Teaching & Writing

Posts from Roof Beam Reader

Currently Reading

  • Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
  • So Big by Edna Ferber (for #CCSPIN)

Thank you for stopping by and taking part in another SUNDAY SALON. There was much to choose from this week, and I hope I have presented you with a decent selection. Some of these I found interesting and engaging, others troubling and bothersome. I would love to hear your thoughts on any of these or the other things you’ve read this week!


All work found on roofbeamreader.com is copyright of the original author and cannot be borrowed, quoted, or reused in any fashion without the express, written permission of the author.


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Sunday Salon

Sunday Salon (1:5)

RBR Sunday Salon

Volume 1, Issue 5

This second week of September might mean Pumpkin Spice lattes and early autumn feelings for many North Americans, but here at Roof Beam Reader it means 108-degree temperatures and another Sunday Salon!

This week, in addition to recapping my own posts and sharing what I’m currently reading, I’m sharing my favorite reads from my favorite bloggers, as well as a number of fascinating articles from across the web, including some on science, history, and politics.

I look forward to hearing about what you’ve read/written this week, or what you think about the links I’ve shared. Please feel free to comment below. Happy September!

Blog Posts I Loved

  • Wild Moo Books: Wrap Up: Big Book Summer Challenge. “Back in June I enthusiastically jumped into my friend Sue’s Big Book Summer Challenge. The challenge was to read books over 400 pages long between Memorial Day and Labor Day.”
  • Interesting Literature: The Pit and the Pendulum and the Short Story: “Of these lesser-known Poe tales, the one that stood out to me was ‘The Domain of Arnheim’, in which Poe seems to lay out his artistic credo in the form of a work of fiction. It’s a love letter to the imagination and a late-Romantic expression of the primacy of the human imagination, describing an imaginary voyage through a poet’s mind.”
  • An Historian About Town: Creating Your Library. “While this is a lovely dream to have, it isn’t as easy as it might seem on the surface, and there is a lot to consider. For a lot of people, it is a way to establish their intellectual self in their home.”

Literary Miscellany

History & Politics

Culture & Society

Science, Tech., & Nature

Teaching & Writing

Posts from Roof Beam Reader

Currently Reading

  • Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
  • So Big by Edna Ferber (for #CCSPIN)

Thank you for stopping by and taking part in another SUNDAY SALON. There was much to choose from this week, and I hope I have presented you with a decent selection. Some of these I found interesting and engaging, others troubling and bothersome. I would love to hear your thoughts on any of these or the other things you’ve read this week!


All work found on roofbeamreader.com is copyright of the original author and cannot be borrowed, quoted, or reused in any fashion without the express, written permission of the author.


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Sunday Salon

Sunday Salon (1:4)

RBR Sunday Salon

Volume 1, Issue 4

Welcome to the fourth volume of Roof Beam Reader’s Sunday Salon!

This week, in addition to recapping my own posts and sharing what I’m currently reading, I’m sharing my favorite reads from my favorite bloggers, as well as a number of fascinating articles from across the web, including some on science, history, and politics.

I look forward to hearing about what you’ve read/written this week, or what you think about the links I’ve shared. Please feel free to comment below. Happy September!

Blog Posts I Loved

Literary Miscellany

  • Lifehacker: “You Shouldn’t Have to Read these Books in High School.” “My own high school stuck close to the classics, making conservative choices that I had to supplement on my own time. This is normal. But given little structure for finding the great books of my own era, or even the less musty ones of recent past, I flailed around, grabbing my mom’s copies of Grisham and Crichton, spending too much time on Palahniuk—all stuff I’d grow out of, and not regret but not particularly cherish.”

History & Politics

  • CNN Politics: “READ: Sen. John McCain’s  Farewell Statement.” “We are citizens of the world’s greatest republic, a nation of ideals, not blood and soil. [ . . . ] We weaken our greatness when we confuse our patriotism with tribal rivalries that have sown resentment and hatred and violence in all the corners of the globe. We weaken it when we hide behind walls, rather than tear them down, when we doubt the power of our ideals, rather than trust them to be the great force for change they have always been.”

Culture & Society

  • Clarion Ledger: “Emmett Till Is No Less Powerful, 63 Years Later.” “In 1955, the image of a battered Emmett Till gave a face to all black men who were victims of violence, men who by the virtue of the color of their skin were presumed to be dangerous.”
  • The Silent Film Quarterly: “No More Tears Over Lost Films.” “In the 21st century, it is easy to look back and lament how many films could have been saved. But the harsh reality is that movie studios were businesses, first and foremost, and there was zero monetary incentive to preserve early films. Once a movie was released and shown at theaters across the country, it was effectively finished. Storage of nitrate film reels was costly and dangerous. If these films had no commercial potential, what was the point of utilizing valuable resources to save them?”

Science, Tech., & Nature

Teaching & Writing

Posts from Roof Beam Reader

Currently Reading

  • Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
  • So Big by Edna Ferber (for #CCSPIN)

Thank you for stopping by and taking part in another SUNDAY SALON. There was much to choose from this week, and I hope I have presented you with a decent selection. Some of these I found interesting and engaging, others troubling and bothersome. I would love to hear your thoughts on any of these or the other things you’ve read this week!


All work found on roofbeamreader.com is copyright of the original author and cannot be borrowed, quoted, or reused in any fashion without the express, written permission of the author.


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