Review: The Centaur by John Updike

I just finished reading The Centaur and I am both enamored and confused. The interwoven tale of Chiron, the Centaur, and Caldwell, the human teacher, is fascinating – especially from Caldwell’s son’s perspective; however, I found much of the story to be disjointed and confusing. This did, in all honesty, add to the overall appeal of the novel for me. I do plan on re-reading the book at some time, to determine whether or not I can understand it better on the second try, knowing what to expect. The characters were brilliant. The moments of Greek Mythological confusion were stunning, beautiful, and terrifying. All in all, quite fantastic.

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