>Review: God Jr. by Dennis Cooper

>For the first time, since years ago, when I first picked up a Dennis Cooper novel (one of the early George Miles cycle books) I was actually surprised by the subject matter of a Cooper work. That’s not to say that I don’t enjoy or appreciate Dennis Cooper’s work; in fact, I’m an avid fan – having now read all but one of his novels. Still, Cooper tends to be predictable in subject matter, theme, and plot. This time, however, Cooper has done something completely new. The plot is innovative, creative, and haunting. The story itself is still Cooper-esque, disturbing and a bit sick, and it is still an examination of death. Except, this time, rather than death as a scientific experiment – in body function, sensory reaction, sexuality, etc., Cooper is explaining death through grief and love – the loss of a child and how his already troubled father tries to cope. Truly brilliant – I read it in one sitting, in a matter of 90 minutes.

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