Review: The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald

I have finally found the time to re-read this novel, and I’m glad. I still don’t believe it is Fitzgerald’s best work (I give that nod to Tender is the Night) but it’s much better than I originally gave it credit for. I was assigned this book in my Freshman year of high school, and I’m not quite sure why. There’s no way imaginable that I could have appreciated or even really understood the novel at that age. Fitzgerald’s descriptions are vivid and rich. There are many memorable quotations and passages, like the famous last line, which might go down as one of my favorite novel endings of all time:

“So we beat on, boats against the current, borne back ceaselessly into the past.” Fantastic. The idea, too, of the dangers of capitalism and the evils of exchanging a love of tangible, “simple” things for the love of money and status.. well worked and presented.

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